Victoria Lecture by Nadia Abu-Zahra

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The Struggle for Unity:
Walls, checkpoints, and fragmentation in Palestine
Nadia Abu-Zahra is a professor at the University of Ottawa who has written extensively on mobility, human security, and militarisation. Her forthcoming book, Restricting Freedom, will be published by Pluto Press (with Adah Kay).

Friday, March 19, 11:00am-12:20pm

Camosun College Lansdowne Campus

Young 211

 
Dr. Nadia Abu-Zahra is an Assistant Professor at the University of Ottawa. She teaches in ethics, international development, human rights, and research methods, and has also taught on climate change and remote sensing. Prior to joining the University of Ottawa, Nadia was a Research Fellow at the University of Oxford.
 
Her writings have been published in various academic journals, including the Journal of Refugee Studies, Practicing Anthropology, Borderlands, and Women's Studies Quarterly. She has contributed to edited volumes including War, Citizenship, Territory (Routledge 2007), Fear: Geopolitics and Everyday Life (Ashgate 2008), the Encyclopedia of Women and Islamic Cultures (Brill 2007), Walls, Borders and Boundaries (Berghahn 2010), and The State of the World’s Refugees (UNHCR 2006). Her forthcoming book, Restricting Freedom, will be published by Pluto Press.
 
Nadia has presented her work in over 50 venues, including the conferences of the British, Canadian and American geographical societies, the American Anthropological Association, the International Network for Urban Research and Action, and the European Social Sciences History Council.
 
She serves on the International Editorial Board and is a regular contributor to the Arab World Geographer. She is also on the Executive Board of the Group of 78, an association of senior Canadian governmental and non-governmental advocates for sustainability and disarmament.
 
Her work has received support from the Canadian International Development Agency, the Ford Foundation, Oxfam International, the University of Oxford, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
 

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