When Goin' Green Ain't Good

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What We Call 'Normal' is Not Always Green
by Mickey Z.
More than 20 years ago, the Exxon Valdez spilled 10.8 million gallons into the Prince William Sound, Alaska. The oil eventually covered 11,000 square miles of ocean. In the aftermath, the National Transportation Safety Board made a number of recommendations, such as changes to the work patterns of Exxon crew in order to address the causes of the accident.
 
In other words, things in the oil business basically got back to normal (e.g. offshore drilling, air pollution, sprawl, climate change, wars fought in oil-rich nations, and all that).

We seem to have an insatiable craving for normal. Amidst the current economic crisis, despite the fear, doubt, and anger, many are waiting breathlessly for the authorities to pronounce: "Don't worry. Things were bad but now, we've gotten everything back to normal."

Okay, but that leads to my first question: what is normal in our country and on our planet? What type of society have we humans cultivated as we sit arrogantly atop the intellectual food chain?
 
[For complete article reference links, please source at Planet Green here.]
 
 
Just because we've been doing things a certain way for a wrong time doesn't mean it's normal
 
 

Among many, many things, normal means there's practically no cod in Cape Cod and perhaps soon, no ice at North Pole.

Normal means strip malls; normal means strip mining.

Normal means America's most irrigated crop is lawn: 40 million acres from sea to shining sea. (Imagine those 40 million acres being used to grow organic vegetable gardens.)

Normal means that every single day, 13 million tons of toxic chemicals are released across the globe; 200,000 acres of rainforest are destroyed; and more than 100 plant or animal species go extinct.

Hmm...maybe normal is the problem, huh?

Fighting 'Normal" for A Greener, Brighter Future Normal

"We act according to the way we experience the world," writes Derrick Jensen. "We experience the world according to how we perceive it. We perceive it the way we have been taught." Which brings us to question #2: Can we break free from some of what we've been taught?
 
Well, since it's no longer considered normal to burn gasoline that contains lead, to drink from Styrofoam cups, to spray DDT, or to run a dog fighting ring, I'd say the answer is yes. Now, we just need to find the will, the stamina, and comrades to make it happen.  
 
 
 

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