BURY MY HEART IN SADR CITY

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BURY MY HEART IN SADR CITY:
BLOOD FOR CORPORATE OIL
by Jack Random

There seems to be a moratorium in media criticism of the Iraq War. It is as if a truce has been declared, as the players hedge their bets in case the assault on Baghdad somehow claims victory from the vice grip of defeat.
 
The masters of media message have anointed General David Petraeus, the new commander in Iraq, a resident genius and savior of the cause, as if replacing General William Westmoreland in 1972 would have altered the outcome of Vietnam.
 
Let me go out on a limb while it is virtually unoccupied: There is not a chance in all the firmament that the siege of Baghdad will succeed.

How do I know this? Am I psychic? Do I have the gift of second sight? Can I divine the future by mystical means? No. I know because I have born witness to the past.
 
 
THE JAZZMAN CHRONICLES:
DISSEMINATE FREELY!
 
The siege of Baghdad is not new. It is the strategy of Fallujah in a city of six million inhabitants. Despite wanton brutality and pathological destruction, it failed in Fallujah. It failed in Ramadi, Mosul, Tal Afar and Samara. That it will fail in Baghdad is as clear as a poet’s desire for a gypsy dancer.

The “strategy” is nothing if not cynical in its naked brutality. The occupation forces enter a target neighborhood, order women and children to leave, and declare a free fire zone on the remaining inhabitants.

The new “strategy” for “victory” in Iraq is a license to kill without restraint. It assumes that the hearts and minds of the people have already been lost. It is not a strategy for victory at all but a means of postponing the outcome while applying pressure for a negotiated settlement in line with America’s corporate interests, the lives of Iraqi civilians and American soldiers be damned.

It is a strategy for preserving American pride, protecting what remains of the president’s reputation, and securing in the balance an oil contract for four monolithic corporations: Exxon-Mobil, Chevron, Shell and British Petroleum (BP).

More than anything else, it is still about the oil.

In our determination to find a way out of this nightmare, to end the killing and the dying, we have allowed our “leaders” and the powers that rule both mainstream parties to promulgate yet another myth of the occupation.

We have been told that there has been no change in our Iraq strategy. We have applauded as Democratic candidates for president have lambasted the president for stubbornly clinging to failed policies and we have joined in the chorus.

It is a lie. It is another in a long line of cruel and costly deceptions. Our president is not the commander. Our president is no longer in charge of the quagmire he helped create. Our president is no longer the decider of Iraq’s fate – if indeed he ever was.

There has in fact been a decisive change in strategy. The real leaders of this bloody endeavor long ago recognized that the occupation was a failure. They have long understood that we would never be able to crush a strong and enduring resistance. We would not be able to dominate the affairs of the Iraqi state. We had failed to deceive the Iraqi people, failed to establish a viable puppet government, and failed to convince the American people that more blood and plundered treasure were in the national interest.

If we could not “win” by domination, if we could not crush the Sunni resistance, we would have to succeed by other means. We intentionally and strategically set out to exploit the sectarian divisions that were a natural and violent outgrowth of American-style democracy in Iraq.

Since we could not dictate Iraqi oil policy directly, we determined to extort the Shiite majority into yielding control of Iraqi oil despite their better judgment.

The Iraqi oil law, promoted by Democrats and Republicans alike as the essential solution to the Iraq civil war, is a thinly disguised privatization scheme that will award the bulk of that nation’s oil to the world’s leading oil corporations. Set to go before the Iraqi Parliament this month, it will by no means solve Iraq’s internal strife but it will accomplish the central goal of the American occupation. [1]

The appropriate analogy is the Black Hills of North Dakota in the latter half of the nineteenth century. When gold was discovered on sacred Lakota lands, the American government declared war on the Lakota people. When the war proved costly to American sensibilities at the Greasy Grass (Little Big Horn), they divided the Lakota into “friendlies” and renegades, killing Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse and slaughtering the Ghost Dancers at Wounded Knee. When they attempted a “negotiated settlement,” they could not find legitimate Lakota leaders willing to sign away their land so they found others who did.

The tragic and despicable truth is that history repeats.

Our soldiers are not dying in vain.

Our soldiers, along with 200 times that many Iraqis, are dying for Exxon-Mobil, Chevron, Shell and British Petroleum.

Our assault on Baghdad is a proxy war of genocide against the Sunni resistance.

Bury my heart in Sadr City.

Jazz.

[1] “Whose Oil Is It, Anyway?” by Antonia Juhasz, New York Times, March 13, 2007.

JACK RANDOM IS THE AUTHOR OF THE JAZZMAN CHRONICLES (CROW DOG PRESS) AND GHOST DANCE INSURRECTION (DRY BONES PRESS). THE CHRONICLES HAVE APPEARED ON THE ALBION MONITOR, PEACE-EARTH-JUSTICE, THE NATIONAL FREE PRESS, PACIFIC FREE PRESS, LEFTWARD, DISSIDENT VOICE AND COUNTERPUNCH. SEE RANDOM JACK: WWW.JAZZMANCHRONICLES.BLOGSPOT.COM

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